Year 6 with Rails

In my sixth year with Rails the Ruby community has been experiencing a sea change: gem innovation has peaked and leading Rails developers have been moving on to JavaScript 6 Node, Dockerized microservices in Go, functional Clojure on the JVM or highly concurrent Elixir Phoenix on the fault tolerant Erlang VM. Despite these defections Ruby adoption has resurged (as, coincidentally, has Java) given new versions that have improved garbage collection and performance. Rails 5 has embraced concurrent-ruby and websockets, while HTTP/2 looks set to drive further significant change to all web application frameworks in the near future.

Meanwhile our in-house multi-currency e-commerce solution has grown to 45kloc, 2,100 tests and nearly 100 gem dependencies thanks to ever expanding integration with fraud detection services, fulfillment providers, payment gateways, email marketing solutions and an autodialer. Between daily business requirements we have been addressing technical debt by straggling to Ruby 2.2, Rails 4.2, RSpec 3.4 and ActiveAdmin 1.0.0.pre2. We have adopted CBRA and gemified the persistence core of the application. New gems adopted have included VCR, Wisper and React on Rails.

On the tools side this year has seen widespread adoption of Slack for distributed teams, but we have stuck with Atlasssian HipChat, configuring integration with Airbrake for production exceptions, Assembla for tickets, BitBucket for code reviews, CodeShip for CI and Coveralls for test coverage. Increasingly global sales have raised expectations of operations to provide 24×7 uptime, monitored by PagerDuty and requiring MySQL hot backups.

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